Quantcast


Newspapers:

Search News Subscribe Contact
Jobs Real Estate Autos
 

SITE SPONSOR: VIEW | CLOSE X



:::

Local News: Windsor-Hights Herald

Thumbnail
HIGHTSTOWN: Lt. Gov. Guadagno visits Rise stores
Organization getting state grant
HIGHTSTOWN — Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno visited the Community Action Service Center, also known as Rise: A Community Service Partnership on Tuesday, to meet with staff and tour two Greater Goods Thrift Store locations in recognition of receiving a grant award through the Department of State’s Office of Faith Based Initiatives (OFBI).

"Rise and its Greater Goods Thrift Stores display the best qualities of community-based services," said Lt. Gov. Guadagno in a press release. "Members of the community support each other through donations and volunteerism, giving their neighbors access to the goods they need and the employment opportunities that will help them achieve independence."

"This is fabulous," she said as she toured the first store.


Opinions

We want your letters. They should not exceed 500 words and need to be accompanied by the writer’s address and daytime telephone number — information used only for confirmation and not published.

TimeOFF

Thumbnail


Life as He Saw It
The Barnes Foundation is hosting an exhibit showcasing 90 works by William Glackens
ON a gray day in late November, I find myself craving color — something to prevent the external dreariness from making its way inward. The paintings of William Glackens, on view at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia through Feb. 2, 2015, offer a tonic, an immersion into ochres and turquoise, pumpkin and periwinkle, pattern and brushwork.

   Glackens’ (1870-1938) canvases of New York’s Washington Square Park, Central Park and beach scenes describe those places, yet also transcend them. It becomes the world of William Glackens, a world influenced by Matisse, Cezanne, Renoir and the French Modernists.

   William Glackens includes 90 major paintings and works on paper from American collectors. There are also 48 works by Glackens hanging in the permanent galleries (and an additional 23 in storage). When the Barnes puts on a solo exhibition of one of its own, it honors the will of its founder and keeps the salon-style hangings intact — yet the rotating exhibitions add new light and insight into the permanent collection. The exhibition on Glackens — whose vision informed the collection — is the most successful since the museum opened in Center City more than two years ago.










Poll

centraljersey.com ads:

Featured Brokers



Princeton Real Estate